Monthly Archives: October 2013

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As fall sports have started up, new coaches at DGS have been collaborating in order to make the Mustangs feel like one big team on and off the field.

The first step that the coaches and teams are taking is during football games.

Varsity football coach and Career and Technical Education teacher Mark Molinari is one of the new coaches for DGS this year that has come up with ideas for making sporting events more inclusive. Molinari has started off with a motivational plan to make all groups at the game feel as a unit.

“Last year I went out to talk to all the athletes and get everyone involved with the football program as much as we could,” Molinari said.

In prior years, there has been separate sections for the cheerleaders, dancers and band members to be placed at during football game, causing separation between the three groups. The dancers and band members would be sitting in the bleachers when not performing, while the cheerleaders would be on the track throughout the entire game.

The SuperFans club has always been a way for students to support DGS teams and to help the student body come together during sporting events. Now, the separate teams that perform during football games have decided to make some changes to their original settings, and join as a whole throughout the entire game.

This year, things will be different. All three groups will be standing on the sideline next to one another to help cheer on the football team as one, making the Mustangs, from all angles, one huge fan base.

Senior Emily David, a member and captain of the Fillies, believes that this new program doesn’t only help bring different groups together but also helps organize the teams, which is an improvement from the way things were set up last year.

“I think [the initiative] is better…I think it’s more organized than last year,” David said.

This year, the groups have specific positions to be standing in. The groups are also able to practice together and go through the steps that will be taken on the football field prior to the game.

From physically placing the dance team, the cheer team, the band and the football team together, encouraging a sense of unity, the students and coaches are willing to do whatever it takes to help support sports and school spirit at DGS.

Vicky Canaday Howard, the new Pintos coach, and her team, are “happy to support the football team in any way we can, so we are happy to be on the track.”

Although the cheerleaders have always been on the track, they have been very welcoming of the changes everyone is going through.

Freshman Peyton Furman, a member of the Varsity cheer team enjoys the idea of all the teams being on the sidelines together.

“Having us all on the sidelines together seems like it will bring us closer as a school,” Furman said.

Molinari describes the program as being “an exerted effort by the new coaches to really make…a sense of community here among all of us, instead of just being independent sports.”

Junior Jacob Baker, a member of the Varsity football team, feels as if this new initiative is leading the teams in the right direction.

The football team, out of all four groups, has gone through the least amount of changes this year. Baker believes it has positively helped make a change during the football games for the separate teams.

“The initiative helps the team feel closer as a unit. Closer as  Mustangs,” Baker said.

As fall sports have started up, new coaches at DGS have been collaborating in order to make the Mustangs feel like one big team on and off the field.

The first step that the coaches and teams are taking is during football games.

Varsity football coach and Career and Technical Education teacher Mark Molinari is one of the new coaches for DGS this year that has come up with ideas for making sporting events more inclusive. Molinari has started off with a motivational plan to make all groups at the game feel as a unit.

“Last year I went out to talk to all the athletes and get everyone involved with the football program as much as we could,” Molinari said.

In prior years, there has been separate sections for the cheerleaders, dancers and band members to be placed at during football game, causing separation between the three groups. The dancers and band members would be sitting in the bleachers when not performing, while the cheerleaders would be on the track throughout the entire game.

The SuperFans club has always been a way for students to support DGS teams and to help the student body come together during sporting events. Now, the separate teams that perform during football games have decided to make some changes to their original settings, and join as a whole throughout the entire game.

This year, things will be different. All three groups will be standing on the sideline next to one another to help cheer on the football team as one, making the Mustangs, from all angles, one huge fan base.

Senior Emily David, a member and captain of the Fillies, believes that this new program doesn’t only help bring different groups together but also helps organize the teams, which is an improvement from the way things were set up last year.

“I think [the initiative] is better…I think it’s more organized than last year,” David said.

This year, the groups have specific positions to be standing in. The groups are also able to practice together and go through the steps that will be taken on the football field prior to the game.

From physically placing the dance team, the cheer team, the band and the football team together, encouraging a sense of unity, the students and coaches are willing to do whatever it takes to help support sports and school spirit at DGS.

Vicky Canaday Howard, the new Pintos coach, and her team, are “happy to support the football team in any way we can, so we are happy to be on the track.”

Although the cheerleaders have always been on the track, they have been very welcoming of the changes everyone is going through.

Freshman Peyton Furman, a member of the Varsity cheer team enjoys the idea of all the teams being on the sidelines together.

“Having us all on the sidelines together seems like it will bring us closer as a school,” Furman said.

Molinari describes the program as being “an exerted effort by the new coaches to really make…a sense of community here among all of us, instead of just being independent sports.”

Junior Jacob Baker, a member of the Varsity football team, feels as if this new initiative is leading the teams in the right direction.

The football team, out of all four groups, has gone through the least amount of changes this year. Baker believes it has positively helped make a change during the football games for the separate teams.

“The initiative helps the team feel closer as a unit. Closer as  Mustangs,” Baker said.

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They say that high school is supposed to be the best four years of a person’s life, but how can it be when it’s been torn in half? The time spent adjusting to a particular high school is wasted, and the shaping of your high school career becomes distorted.

I moved to Downers Grove, IL the summer before my junior year, and I was anxious to start at a new school. As I trudged through the front doors of DGS and glanced at all the vacant-eyed students in the overpopulated hallways, I knew I was not ready for what was in store for me. High school can already be struggling, let alone moving to a new town, as well as a new school.

I transferred to DGS from Minooka, IL, a small town surrounded by cornfields and open roads. My old school, Minooka Community High School was at most at a capacity of 1,500 students. Stepping foot into such a large school was overwhelming, to say the least.

Switching high schools after already growing accustomed to one is hard because you now become a new face. All the other faces are already committed to other people, other activities, and other various subjects, like clubs and sports. It’s your responsibility to find a way into the lives of people already comfortable with their environment, and sometimes it’s easier said than done to go about the day with a smile on your face.

I found myself lost before the start of first period; as I ventured from my locker to the first class of my first day, I realized I had turned the wrong corner and walked the opposite way from my classroom. Needless to say, there were a lot of wrong turns on my first day.

Although I made it safely through the first day at a new school, I knew things could go only one of two ways: up or down. I could either make do with what I have been given, or I could crumble like a cookie.

When you’re new to a school, it feels as though every person already has their mark on the school; their own friends, and their own spot to fit into each and every day. Moving in the middle of everything can leave you in a state of helplessness.

Maybe it’s the lack of friendship, or the constant feeling of missing the people I left behind when I moved—including my best friend in the entire world—or maybe it’s the mere fact that I grew up in the same town for the majority of my life that makes moving to a new high school disappointing.

Although it feels like high school won’t get any better for me, there are things I, or any new student for that matter, can do to make each day slightly better than the last. Personally, I got a job over the summer, and it keeps me busy after school on most days.

For students who may not be old enough for a job, or have no luck in the job department, you can join a sport or find a club to immerse yourself in. At least this way you’re making friends, and hopefully providing yourself with more of a reason to come to school rather than just to get an education. Having a mundane high school career with no memorable experiences or positive impacts is a life no one deserves to grow fond of.

Being in an entirely new town, going to an entirely new school, and meeting entirely new people means high school may or may not end up being the “best four years of my life.” However, that does not mean it needs to be the same for you. Make the best of what you have, and always keep a positive mindset that things will become easier, and that whole “new student” label that comes with moving will disappear.

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Senior Kelly Rahe shows off her bowling skills, exhibiting what psychologist Howard Gardner calls “Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence” or “body smart.”Photos by Crystal Panganiban

Senior Kelly Rahe shows off her bowling skills, exhibiting what psychologist Howard Gardner calls “Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence” or “body smart.”
Photos by Crystal Panganiban

 By Marygrace Schumann, Opinions Editor

I’ll let you in on a little secret: Everyone is smart.

The  girl who sits three seat behind you in math — the one who has no sense of direction and couldn’t solve the quadratic formula if her life depended on it — is smart. The boy in your English class who never remembers his pencil — the one with zero common sense and a knack for mistaking Jay Gatsby for Holden Caulfield — is smart. The world’s best kept and most troubling secrets is this: intelligence knows no limits. It’s prominent and fresh in everyone’s bones.

It’s hard to admit, especially to our 4.0 GPA students who’ve had this honor metaphorically and sometimes, literally, bestowed onto them. The word “smart” carries such constrained connotations in our society. It’s reserved, compact, only for the best. Kids with sloppy A’s scrawled on their math tests and six AP classes who only need five cups of coffee to keep up with all of it.  It’s even harder to admit to those with “street smarts,” who feel that real intelligence is only for people who know how to live in the “real world.”

But intelligence goes much farther than “street” vs. “school” smarts.  According to psychologist Howard Gardner’s Multiple Intelligence Theory, intelligence can manifest itself in nine different ways. While this includes things like math or reading, it also filters out to more unconventional forms of intelligence. Things like understanding one’s body, religion, themselves and/or the people around them are all considered forms of intelligence.

The theory suggests that an individual’s intelligence is not restricted by their grades or even “real world knowledge.” What makes someone intelligent can be what they’re passionate about, what they’re good at, what they understand.

Sophomore Ryan Kolb  doesn’t consider intelligence to be directly correlated to grades.

“When I call someone smart, it’s usually because they think differently than others generally do.”

In many senses, this is exactly what intelligence is. Intelligence is, in itself, about individuality. It’s different in every person.

According to Senior Kelly Rahe, being able to celebrate and recognize different forms of intelligences is very important.

“I think that being able to play an instrument and being able to fix things is definitely a type of intelligence, because I like to consider myself pretty smart even if I know I can’t do that at all,” Rahe said.

Unfortunately, our society puts more worth on certain forms of intelligence. In fact, society often doesn’t consider an individual’s passion or talent to be a true form of intelligence.  Instead of being encouraged to find the ways in which they are individually smart, they are pressed to uncover a type of intelligence that fits with our general education system.

This is not only dispiriting, but causes many kids to avoid perusing and understanding their individual form of intelligence. By evading to put equal worth to different forms of intelligences, our society is causing many people to feel their talents — whether it’s fixing cars or giving grade-A-advice — aren’t as important.

In France, it’s a viable option to attend a trade school rather than a formal high school. Trade schools allow for students to pursue an education that better aligns with what they’re passionate about. According to France native         and foreign   language teacher Isabelle Menke, trade schools are considered  “very valuable” in France, despite it not being an academic degree.

“We don’t assume that everybody is high school material. [Therefore] if some students show that they have abilities in other areas than academics than it’s strongly recommended that they take another path,” Menke said.

While students can attend specialty schools after high school, and are able to attend programs like Technology Center of Dupage (TCD) here at DGS, kids are generally encouraged to go through formal education, even if a typical high school and university doesn’t cater to their type of intelligence.

While going to a trade school isn’t necessarily looked down upon in France, Menke suggests that kids whose parents have gone through more formal education will be “pushed, just like they are [in America], to stay on the regular track.”

“But you know some kids [just] want…to become a mechanic or plumber,” Menke said. “[They want to do] what they’re good at.”

Rahe feels that DGS fails to cater to different types of intelligence.

“In my experience I don’t think DGS really caters to different types of intelligence because all of my classes have always focused on grades and test scores,” Rahe said.

However, Menke feels that DGS does its best to accommodate to different types of intelligences, at least within the class room

“I believe that as teachers, we have to [cater to all different types of intelligences],” Menke said. “I also think it’s very difficult to do consistently…. It could be, in some cases, even though it’s valued…it could be implemented a little bit better.”

Though DGS and other high schools in America do offer classes that gratify different forms of intelligences, it’s clear that society as a whole puts more worth of general academic intelligence. While this type of intelligence is certainly important, our society needs people with all different types of intelligences to truly function.

Though the classroom may keep in mind different learning styles and intelligences in order to teach certain material, some kids are just more intelligent in areas that America’s school system fails to promote or even provide.

Instead of assuming that everyone wants or needs a formal education, we should try to gear kids toward the path that will make them most successful and, above all, the happiest.

Intelligence is not exclusive but rather universal. But like most universal things, the beauty of it lies in its diversity.  From your childhood rabbi to your next-door neighbor with mad baseball skills to your best friends with the straight A’s and D’s in art class, intelligence is just as unique as we all are.

Our job is not to put restrictions on intelligence, but rather to understand and accept not only the ways intelligence manifests itself in our own minds but also in each other’s.

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By Gabhriel Bell, News Editor

SecurityDesk

This school year DGS, along with neighboring schools in the district, upgraded its security system as a preventative for violence to occur.
Photo by Crystal Panganiban

 

 

 

 

 

 

In today’s society the question of “Why is school safety important?” is simply answered by looking at the number of increasing incidences of violence in schools. The DGS administration has decided to changed its security procedures for entering the building this year, thus attempting to make the environment more safe and less likely for a catastrophic event to occur.

From the location of the sign in desk, to the procedure needed to enter the building, Associate Principal of Operations and Technology Edward Schwartz gives insight into the changes that are taking place this school year.

“We’ve rearranged the location of the desk where we greet visitors when they come [in order] to make an easier flow to and from the library for the kids,” Schwartz said.” This way [students] aren’t mixed in with the visitors before they are even logged into the system. We [also] have a computer system so when everyone comes in they have to present their State ID or license that will then scan their ID [to] log them into our system.”

According to City-Data.com,  there are 14 registered sex offenders living in Downers Grove as of Sept. 24, 2013, and the ratio of number of residents to the number of sex offenders is 3,510 to one. This is the reason why, in addition to scanning visitor’s identification cards, the new system runs names through a sex offender database to check for known offenders that may attempt to enter the school.

Woodridge Police and DGS Officer Mark Walters believes that the new system is a way to prevent such offenders from entering because it gives administrators a better eye of the school and of what’s going on during the day.

“The nice part about it is that [the card] has their picture on it, so the picture [must] match the face. [This way], it would be very hard for just anyone to come in,” Walters said. “Each year they continue to upgrade the system..which assures everyone coming in thats its a safe environment. [We think] parents can rest more assured with these kind of security measures being taken, [knowing] that their kids will be able to learn and hopefully something bad will not happen.”

In addition to scanning identification cards, another part of the software will notify the proper authorities if an incident were to occur. Schwartz believes that this is an essential part of the security update because it limits the amount of time an event has to escalate.

“[The software ]can send a  text, phone call, or email to whomever you want – we have it setup to notify the police in the building – [and] then the [authorities] will go to the front desk,” Schwartz said. “It’s nice because when we tested the system it took less than 10 seconds for an automatic notification to be sent.”

Sophomore Claudia Fisher thinks that the security upgrade is beneficial because she now feels that the chances of violence happening at DGS are lower.

“It’s good that [the school] is trying to make everyone feel safer now,” Fisher said. “With all the violence in the world, anything can happen and this is just one way to try to make us feel safer and prevent anything like that from happening.”

Downers Grove Police and DGS Officer Jim Edwards is pleased with the new upgrade and believes that “[The system is] a nice enhancement because unfortunately it’s a crazy world we’re living in right now.”

With the new system in place, Walters feels that the new security measures can and will only bring a positive change to DGS.

“With the amount of school violence that has occurred, it’s a positive for this district to enhance its security measures based on what has been occurring [on the] outside; meaning in other jurisdictions, other places, other states, where they are having crazy violence,” Walters said. “This district is taking the initiative to make the place more secure so  we don’t have a run in with that kind of incident. We are here and we want to make sure the students and staff are safe.”

 

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DanFlag

Senior Dan Holakovsky has always dreamed of being in the military, as service is a family tradition for him.
Photo Illustration by Eleni Eisenhart and Crystal Panganiban

By Eleni Eisenhart, Editor-in-Chief

Having the biggest military system established in the world, the United States holds a large power over the military and what happens with it. The U.S. is now faced with the issue of what appropriate actions need to happen towards Syria.

The event that is seen as the starting point of Syria’s conflict begins with the Arab Spring in 2010. Youth-led protests were springing up everywhere, all wanting a democracy. Since then, many different rebel groups have arisen, all motivated by different factors, such as religion.

The rebels have been working together to achieve a mutual goal of overthrowing the government of the current president of Syria, Bashar al-Assad. These groups have been punished by the al-Assad regime with penalties including jail, the torturing of families and killings.

Contemporary American Issues teacher James Crider has been spending his class time discussing the different outcomes that could happen in Syria.

“During the Arab Spring, many countries overthrew their dictators in the Middle East and…some of the people of Syria took that opportunity to try to overthrow their dictator,” Crider said. “So they’ve been trying ever since and [al-Assad]…has been resistant and violent. [The people of Syria have]…a civil war going on.”

Fast forward to more recently, al-Assad has started the use of chemical weapons against his own people, which “President Obama had said prior…that [al-Assad]…would be crossing a red line if he used those weapons,” Crider said.

John Kerry, the current Secretary of State of the U.S., proposed a solution that entailed Syria giving up all of their chemical weapons and destroying them. Syria, along with allied Russia, rapidly agreed to this solution. The situation being decided on now is what Obama is going to do about the “red line” he spoke of earlier this year, as well as how the chemical weapons—which have been used against citizens in Syria—will be removed.

For senior Dan Holakovsky, being in the military has always been a dream of his, as service is a family tradition for him. “I want to lead up to the Marines and then after my four year tour, I want to [join the]…Navy SEALs.”

Situations like the one going on in Syria could potentially impact Holakovsky’s time in service in the upcoming years.

“The positives [of the military taking action in Syria]…would be for the men and women that want to help their country. This would be the time to do it because they’re going somewhere out of the country to make this place safer [for us],” Holakovsky said.

With family in the military, senior Alexis Conklin feels proud of her family and the men and women who serve. However, she finds the situation people in the armed forces are put into on a day-to-day basis, especially within her own family, to be frightening.

“I definitely think that anything we do [towards Syria] should…be as nonviolent as possible because…having family in the military…is kind of terrifying when we decide to start wars, because you want to be proud for your country, and you want them to go out and fight but at the same time…you don’t want your family to leave,” Conklin said.

Although there is no set plan on what could happen in Syria, Crider believes the most productive way to go about the situation would be for Obama to “punish Syria…for using…chemical weapons [against its people] that other leaders in the world would think twice before [potentially] using their [chemical weapons].”

Holakovsky feels one of the negatives of going to war with Syria would be the casualties of U.S. soldiers.

“Having a flag come home to your family, saying…your son or daughter just died in combat, well, they weren’t supposed to be there in the first place because it’s not our war,” Holakovsky said.

As citizens of a democracy, the people have a substantial say in what happens in the U.S., an example being our right to vote on issues and choose individuals to represent them. Therefore, U.S. citizens’ opinions about the Syria situation are being heard and accounted for.

“We like quick and painless interventions, we like showing our muscle, although the American public seems to be pretty clearly opposed to intervention in Syria, I think we’re war weary and war wary,” Crider said. “What it’s done is it has distracted us from immigration reform…It’s distracted us from budget solutions…So it’s making it harder for us to get the things done that Americans want to get done.”

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Senior Luke Dorner will remain a fan of Katy Perry and Miley Cyrus, even after their image changes this past summer.

Senior Luke Dorner will remain a fan of Katy Perry and Miley Cyrus, even after their image changes this past summer.

As some students decide on their new appearance for the school year, celebrities also have to decide if they will change their image. Two well-known artists, whom students have grown up with, Katy Perry and Miley Cyrus, have drastically changed how they look and the type of music they are producing.

English teacher Lauren Mietelski believes that “every artist that starts so young has to go through [a change] in order to become their own person.”

Mietelski speculates this because when she was younger, an artist who she respected had completely changed her image as well. Christina Aguilera went through a similar transformation that Cyrus has done this past summer, morphing from the sweet, little teen idol that teenagers admired, to a grown-up and sexy icon.

Mietelski was OK with Aguilera’s image change because she felt that she had grown up at the same time as Aguilera, and an adjustment of some sort was needed.

“I feel like I kind of changed as well,” Mietelski said. “I was a teeny bopper when she was appealing to the teeny boppers, and then when she went for an older audience, I was older and kind of liked the change. I felt it was [a]…natural change.”

Perry has gone in a completely different route from Cyrus and has burned her iconic blue wig, and put her old self-image to rest. On Aug. 5, Perry’s official VEVO Channel published a video, “The Third Coming.” This video was a funeral for her old image, where Perry lookalikes and fans were distraught by their idol’s image being dead.

Although this was not a real funeral, it was held as if a real person was being put to rest. There was a pastor, and all the attendees were dressed in black and were crying.

Senior Luke Dorner, a Perry fan from the beginning, was “definitely confused,” when he saw the video that Perry had published to inform everyone of her new album, PRISM. However, he felt that the video did its job of promoting her new album.

Another Perry fan, senior Bella Cherry feels that this transition will be valuable for Perry but acknowledges that she may lose some fans.

“I think she may not be as popular with the…party girls who listen to her on the beach,” Cherry said. “But I think that more people will be interested because it’s more catchy music.”

Perry gave her fans somewhat of a warning with her change by posting the funeral video on her VEVO channel; Cyrus, however, did not. When Cyrus performed on the Video Music Awards (VMAs), many people, fans and non-fans, had mixed feelings. On the VMAs Cyrus performed one of her new songs, “We Can’t Stop,” mixed with a lot of twerking and sensual behavior.

After her performance, social media sites blew up, and many gossip channels were jumping at the chance to talk about this “New Miley” the world was seeing.

Mietelski had watched “E! News” while they were covering Cyrus’ performance and decided that she had to see if what they were saying about it was really true, so she watched part of the video.

“I think they did blow [her performance] up,” Mietelski said. “They…[wanted] to make it seem like more of a big deal than what it really [was].”

Dorner, also a Cyrus fan, believes that “no one deserves bad criticism from anyone.”

“I have so much respect for all different types of artists, even if it is a genre I don’t typically listen to,” Dorner said. “So of course Cyrus does not deserve the degrading comments and judgments she receives from media. It’s not respectful and it’s definitely not doing anything but motivating [her] to do better and [prove others wrong].”

On the other side, Mietelski thinks that Cyrus is just rebelling and trying to figure out who she really is.

“I think it’s just a rough patch [where she’s] trying to figure things out,” Mietelski said. “She’ll get over this…and figure out who she actually is, instead of trying to rebel.”

No matter what happens with Perry’s and Cyrus’s new images and sounds, Dorner and Cherry both agree that they will continue being fans.

“[Cyrus and Perry are] ready to start a new journey in [their] music, and I’m sure it will sound great,” Dorner said.

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An Illinois High School Association (IHSA) soccer referee calls out-of-bounds during the Boys’ Varsity soccer game against Fenton on Sept. 28, 2013.
An Illinois High School Association (IHSA)  soccer referee calls out-of-bounds during the Boys’ Varsity soccer game against Fenton on Sept. 28, 2013.

An Illinois High School Association (IHSA) soccer referee calls out-of-bounds during the Boys’ Varsity soccer game against Fenton on Sept. 28, 2013.

Sports officials are a common sight at DGS. Not only are 15 out of the 20 sports offered at DGS overseen by sporting officials, but many students and faculty spend time officiating sporting events as well.

According to the National Association of Sport Officials (NASO), these officials, including referees and umpires, “ensure games are played fairly, by the rules, within the spirit of the rules and in a safe manner.”

Physical Education teacher Colleen Reagan has been officiating volleyball matches for the past nine years. She believes that although officials have an important role in the game, they should not stand out.

“It shouldn’t be about me,” Reagan said. “People shouldn’t…even notice [me]. I’m there just to make sure that the teams are following the rules.”

This is consistent in what the Illinois High School Association (IHSA) expects of its officials. Throughout the school year, IHSA officials, like Reagan, are rated by coaches of the teams they officiate for on their performance. Based upon their rating, they are given opportunities to officiate events including sectionals, regionals and state tournaments.

Similar to this, officials for professional sports like the National Football League (NFL) are graded weekly. If there are any issues with the calls they make or do not make, they are downgraded. A multitude of mistakes can require them to pay fines, or cost them the opportunity to officiate in the playoffs or the Superbowl.

Reagan thinks that this is not only a fair process, but an important motivation for referees.

“I don’t have a problem with being graded and being rated because it makes you strive to be better,” Reagan said.

Although you must be at least 17 years old to become an IHSA official, there are other options available to younger students. Downers Grove Youth Baseball allows anyone 12 and older to umpire after attending training sessions. Similarly, the Illinois Soccer Referee Committee allows anyone ages 12 and older to become a referee after attending a clinic and passing a test each year.

Sophomore Catherine Lynch started refereeing for soccer when she was 13. Although she believes it was a good learning experience, Lynch ended her time officiating last year because she wasn’t enjoying it anymore.

“It was a lot of pressure to be a referee [and] not…make the coaches [and/or] parents angry,” Lynch said. “It’s difficult…There are a lot of rules you have to know [and it’s hard to] not make any mistakes.”

In sporting events, officials have to make important calls, either for or against each team. In most sports, an official cannot retract or change their call, even if they realize that they have made a mistake. This often leads to criticism from the team, the coaches and the fans.

As a referee, Lynch has experienced anger directed toward her because of calls she has made.

“It’s very stressful because…if you make a wrong call it can cause [a team] to lose, and parents [might] get angry at you…or players might…act disrespectful toward you,” Lynch said.

Lynch has experienced a situation while working as an assistant referee, in which the other referee made a controversial call. Even though she was not the one to make the call, angry parents on the sidelines began to yell at Lynch.

While Lynch has had a problem with parents, it is also common for athletes to become angry at officials. Senior Taulant Beshiri, a member of the Boys’ Varsity soccer team, understands the frustration that may cause athletes to act negatively in this way.

“When you’re an athlete and you’re on the field and [the official has made] a big mistake…you kind of just want to tear [the official] apart,” Beshiri said.

Nevertheless, Beshiri feels that these emotions are unreasonable and should not be acted upon.

“[Off] the field, you have to thank [the officials] because they do their job, and it’s a tough job,” Beshiri said.

Reagan has also experienced negative reactions because of her calls, but she believes that criticism is something that officials should expect with their job.

“I just work hard to be fair and impartial, and if there’s a bad reaction to that, or if someone sees something differently than I do, then that’s just…part of the gig,” Reagan said.

Varsity Girls’ Volleyball coach and Special Services teacher Trisha Kurth considers the referees for volleyball in Dupage County to be of high quality. She believes that the quality of a referee can determine whether or not athletes have a positive or negative experience in their sport.

“I never want the kids to think they lost the match because of bad refereeing,” Kurth said.

Concurrently, Kurth believes that athletes will have a more positive experience when they learn to accept the officials’ calls, whether the calls are in their favor or not.

“I always tell the kids that what the referees call is the final judgment,” Kurth said. “The referee is going to call what they see, but [athletes] tend to not realize that a referee is never going to change their call.”

The Varsity Boys’ Soccer coaches also work hard to educate their players about reacting to referees. Beshiri believes that his coaches do an effective job of teaching their athletes to be respectful.

“Our coaches for soccer do a very good job of…making bad calls [in practice], to see us adapt to it,” Beshiri said. “In games we usually don’t…complain a lot to the referees.”

Similar to many DGS coaches, Lynch urges athletes to be respectful to officials.

“There has to be a line where you don’t question the [official],” Lynch said. “You just have to continue playing, no matter what.”